The Villanova Times Circa 2007


 

The Villanova Times was founded in 2005 to improve the flow of information and the discourse of opinion on campus.
For several years this was the Villanova Times website.
Content is from the site's 2007 archived April 18 2007 pages providing a few examples of what this site offered its readership.

The current website for the Villanova Times is found at: https://vutimes.wordpress.com/

The Villanova Times publishes throughout the academic year, generally on a monthly basis. Look for the print edition in all major campus buildings and many of the dorms on campus. There is a “blog” which serves as a supplement to the print publication and includes updates and corrections for each issue.

About Villanova University

Villanova University was founded in 1842 by the Order of St. Augustine. To this day, Villanova’s Augustinian Catholic intellectual tradition is the cornerstone of an academic community in which students learn to think critically, act compassionately and succeed while serving others. There are more than 10,000 undergraduate, graduate and law students in the University’s six colleges

 

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Wednesday, April 18, 2007

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I Hear it in the Deep Heart's Core"
Irish Poets Visit Nova

by Charlotte Thurston in News
On Thursday April 12, in the Presidents' Lounge of the Connelly Center, Eamon Grennan and Peter Fallon read their poetry as part of Irish Festival, a celebration of Irish culture throughout the months of March and April. Grennan and Fallon are both former holders of the Charles J.…

Displace Me Campaign

by Andrew Moriarty in News
Displace Me! On April 28, 2007, thousands of people around the United States will have a chance to experience the conditions suffered daily by civilians in the war-torn region of Uganda. Invisible Children Inc. will be sponsoring a program called Displace Me, where volunteers live 24 hours in meager conditions to understand the problems that plague Uganda's lands.

Philadelphia High School Violence a Growing Concern

by Max Stendahl in News
Last Thursday, Paul Vallas announced his plan to step down from his position as CEO of the Philadelphia School District at the end of the year, the latest in a slew of turmoil surrounding local high schools and administration. Vallas, known as much for his sweeping, progressive moves in education reform as for his conspicuous mishandling of the School Reform Commission (SRC) budget, seems to be only the tip of the iceberg for a problem that runs far deeper than executive administration.

DNA Stalkers

by Deena El Genaidi in News
A recent trend in cheap DNA testing has people across the country seeking out their family trees with astounding determination. A DNA test can quickly and accurately tell if people are related. Katherine Borges, co-founder of the International Society of Genetic Genealogy states, "people who realize the potential of DNA will go to great lengths to get it.

Class of '07 Standouts Shoot for the NFL
How Draft Status Ambiguity, New-Found Free Time, Teaching and Video Games | Help a Few Seniors Prep for the Future

by Jon Mattise in Sports
There was something surreal about it all. March 25th rolled by, and like clockwork, that meant all of their teammates donned their pads, and took to the turf to prep for next season. But while their protg's started day one of spring practices, just two days earlier five seniors marketed themselves to prospective employers in a mini combine.

 



 

Class of '07 Standouts Shoot for the NFL

How Draft Status Ambiguity, New-Found Free Time, Teaching and Video Games Help a Few Seniors Prep for the Future

Jon Mattise

Issue date: 4/18/07 Section: Sports

There was something surreal about it all.

March 25th rolled by, and like clockwork, that meant all of their teammates donned their pads, and took to the turf to prep for next season. But while their protégés started day one of spring practices, just two days earlier five seniors marketed themselves to prospective employers in a mini combine.

"The fact that I'm done here hasn't settled," said Mike Costanzo, an offensive lineman from Pittsburgh. "You're just kind of like, 'what's going on,' watching guys at practice and you're not out there."

The seniors displayed their abilities in front of about 15 scouts at Villanova in a recruiting tradition called pro day. Now it's a waiting game - with plenty of uncertainty - to see if they have what it takes to earn a spot in the NFL. Either way, Costanzo, quarterback Marvin Burroughs, offensive lineman Chris Gaddis, defensive back Allyn Bacchus and defensive back Terrance Reaves are taking a shot at a lifelong dream.

"I was at the first scrimmage, and sitting up in the stands and watching is different," Bacchus said. "But that was when I realized, I said to myself, 'I really hope someone lets me play more football.' I was pretty much coaching up in the stands."

But nothing is cut and dry in the scouting process. Burroughs remembers this well after last season. The Atlantic City, N.J. product watched as his good buddy, former Wildcat halfback - and current NFL Europe player - J.J. Outlaw went through it all. Signing an agent, the inpidual workouts with teams, the whole ordeal. And after pro day and a workout with the Eagles, he knows now that teams don't let anything slip if they see something they like.

"I had a workout with the Eagles last Monday, and the coaches and scouts don't give out much information," Burroughs said. "… J.J. called me yesterday, and it's funny because I was there when he went through it. He told me, 'Just be yourself, don't be afraid to make mistakes.'"

It doesn't help to have the added "I-AA" burden. The I-AA standout has his work cut out for him trying to enter the league. The seniors agreed that no matter how good you are at this level, there is always the lingering question: Can you stack up with the big boys from the Big Ten, SEC, or Pac-10?

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"I Hear it in the Deep Heart's Core"

Irish Poets Visit Nova

Charlotte Thurston

Issue date: 4/18/07 Section: News

On Thursday April 12, in the Presidents' Lounge of the Connelly Center, Eamon Grennan and Peter Fallon read their poetry as part of Irish Festival, a celebration of Irish culture throughout the months of March and April. Grennan and Fallon are both former holders of the Charles J. Heimbold, Jr. chair in Irish studies at Villanova, and are world-renowned for their poems. They were introduced by Justin Quinn, the current holder of the Heimbold chair and fellow acclaimed poet.

Eamon Grennan and Peter Fallon are prolific poets, with many books to their name (many of which are found in Falvey library). Fallon has also garnered admiration as the founder of Gallery Press, the most widely respected publishing house in Ireland. Though they both grew up in Ireland and have spent time in Dublin, and their poems reveal the imprint of Irish landscapes on their minds, they have by no means limited themselves to one country: Eamon Grennan teaches English at Vassar College most of the year, and Peter Fallon has given readings all over the world, including Villanova. Grennan even has a quote from the German poet Rilke at the beginning of every section of his book of poetry, So It Goes. Dr. Quinn describes these two poets as "great performers of their own work," bringing out the meaning and feel of their work through their unique voices.

These Irish poets do not only exhibit the lyricism present and cherished in Irish poetry for thousands of years, but their experiences of Ireland today, as well as their international influences. Many Irish poets have become immigrants not out of economic desperation but by choice, curious about other countries as many Villanova students are curious about Ireland and the rest of the world. Though previous generations have often been obsessed with the idea of the Irish nation, and exhibited it through their poetry, Dr. Quinn's generation has strayed from that idea, preferring to include other places in their repertoire of homes and influences. The nationalist approach has "disappeared in a puff of smoke," Dr. Quinn, who has resided in Prague with his family for years, says.

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Philadelphia High School Violence a Growing Concern

 

Max Stendahl

Issue date: 4/18/07 Section: News

Last Thursday, Paul Vallas announced his plan to step down from his position as CEO of the Philadelphia School District at the end of the year, the latest in a slew of turmoil surrounding local high schools and administration. Vallas, known as much for his sweeping, progressive moves in education reform as for his conspicuous mishandling of the School Reform Commission (SRC) budget, seems to be only the tip of the iceberg for a problem that runs far deeper than executive administration.

Other areas of concern plague the school district, most notably an increase in the number and severity of incidents taking place within Philadelphia schools. The problems include budgetary concerns, issues with questionable leadership, unrealistic time frames for progress, and a general sense of chaos both in management and in school hallways and classrooms.

Vallas continuously butted heads with incumbent Mayor John Street, leading to the decision to resign. While at his post in Philadelphia, Vallas has supervised growth in the number of smaller, theme-based high schools and has instituted an increasingly standardized curriculum. Additionally, standardized test scores have risen somewhat even during a time of significant shifting in the bureaucracy.

His successes include the effort to move unruly students from classrooms to disciplinary schools, as well as a call for increased parental involvement in student affairs. Vallas has sought to expedite the pision of oversized West Philadelphia High into smaller schools and has recently announced an innovative Teacher Safety Hotline in the Office of Safe Schools Advocate to eradicate judgment calls and secrecy by principals when incidents occur.

James Golden, the Chief Safety Executive for the School District of Philadelphia, believes the Hotline will help to clean up classrooms directly and efficiently. "The goal of this new accelerated process is to immediately suspend any offender involved in an assault or attempted assault, pending an immediate investigation of the incident, and to add a new layer of independent review and accountability to any assault involving school personnel." His occupation as Chief Safety Executive involves overseeing the Office of School Climate and Safety. "The OSCS comprises the District's 24/7 school police operation and all prevention, intervention, preparedness and safety programs and staff, including safety experts, psychologists who work with the District's Crisis Teams, and community partners."

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